Editors 2018-2019


Yadira Valencia

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Yadira Valencia is a doctoral student in the Social Science and Comparative Education division (Race and Ethnic Studies specialization at UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies). Born and raised is South Los Angeles. She has been the cohort coordinator of the UndocuBruins Research Program, that is hosted in the Academic Advancement Program at UCLA, for the past four years. Her research focused on the educational lived experiences of Latinas from mixed-status families, in and out of higher education. 


Gracen Brilmyer 

Gracen Brilmyer is a third year PhD student in the Department of Information Studies. Working at the intersection of disability studies, archival studies and natural history, they are interested in how disability studies can serve as a lens to understand power and colonialism within archives and museums. Specifically, their research traces the conflation of disability, race, and animality within natural history museums. They received their Masters in Information Management and Systems from UC Berkeley in 2016.

Gracen Brilmyer is a third year PhD student in the Department of Information Studies. Working at the intersection of disability studies, archival studies and natural history, they are interested in how disability studies can serve as a lens to understand power and colonialism within archives and museums. Specifically, their research traces the conflation of disability, race, and animality within natural history museums. They received their Masters in Information Management and Systems from UC Berkeley in 2016.


Christine Vega

Christine Vega is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS) Social Science and Comparative Education. Her work is focused on spirituality, maternal activism, race, gender and motherhood in higher education. She was born and raised in Pacoima and a proud scholar-activist merging both academia, activism and spirituality. She is a co-mother/activist working with Mothers of Color in Academia de UCLA and our collective, Chicana M(other)work.

Christine Vega is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS) Social Science and Comparative Education. Her work is focused on spirituality, maternal activism, race, gender and motherhood in higher education. She was born and raised in Pacoima and a proud scholar-activist merging both academia, activism and spirituality. She is a co-mother/activist working with Mothers of Color in Academia de UCLA and our collective, Chicana M(other)work.


Yvonne Eadon

Yvonne Eadon is a 3rd-year PhD student in Information Studies at UCLA. Her research focuses on how conspiracy theorists conduct research, particularly in archives, as well as the concept of "creepiness" and how it relates to technology.

Yvonne Eadon is a 3rd-year PhD student in Information Studies at UCLA. Her research focuses on how conspiracy theorists conduct research, particularly in archives, as well as the concept of "creepiness" and how it relates to technology.


Sonia Jamani

Sonia is a second year graduate student in the Human Development and Psychology Program at University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests are centered on children’s memory strategies, metamemory, conceptual development, and transfer of learning. Her goal is to create interventions so children can optimize their learning and improve their cognitive skills. Currently, she is working on her master’s thesis, where she is analyzing children’s early strategic memory, metamemory, and academic achievement and seeing how they relate to children’s later study skills. Sonia is also curious to understand how children decide which study strategies work best for them.

Sonia is a second year graduate student in the Human Development and Psychology Program at University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests are centered on children’s memory strategies, metamemory, conceptual development, and transfer of learning. Her goal is to create interventions so children can optimize their learning and improve their cognitive skills. Currently, she is working on her master’s thesis, where she is analyzing children’s early strategic memory, metamemory, and academic achievement and seeing how they relate to children’s later study skills. Sonia is also curious to understand how children decide which study strategies work best for them.